Join InHerSight's growing community of professional women and get matched to great jobs and more!
Sign Up
Already have an account? Log in
[production]
Rate Now

5 Great Reads: Protests, Professionalism & Allyship

June 8: Good and insightful things we’ve read online in the past week

Image courtesy of cosmaa

Workflow

1. ‘Silence is not an option’

We saw many companies, including ours, release statements in support of the Black Lives Matter last week, but none were so glowingly reviewed as that of Ben & Jerry’s. The ice cream company has a long history of political activism; they have signature social mission flavors, and their cofounders were even arrested when protesting in 2016. But what makes the brand’s reaction so refreshing is its distinct lack of corporate jargon. We know exactly where they stand, and that feels good. Ben & Jerry’s

2. ‘Maintaining professionalism in the age of Black death is….a lot’

Some beautifully written pieces emerged amid the protests, many of which touched on how exhausting it can be for Black employees to pretend to be okay at work when racism, hate, and violence are dominating our news feeds. This quote from writer Shenequa Golding stands out: “I don’t know who decided that being professional was loosely defined as being divorced of total humanity, but whoever did they’ve aided, unintentionally maybe, in a unique form of suffocation.” Medium

Women to know

3. ‘Ella Jones is elected first Black mayor of Ferguson’

That glimmer of hope from Missouri? That’s Ella Jones being elected the first Black mayor of Ferguson, a city that erupted in protests in 2014 after a white police officer shot and killed teenager Michael Brown. In the aftermath of the protests, Ferguson became one of the smallest cities in the U.S. to have a federal consent decree, or a legally binding agreement requiring reforms to the police department. NY Times

4. 'Why aren’t we all talking about Breonna Taylor?'

Breonna Taylor was shot eight times in her own home, when officers from the Louisville Metro Police Department entered her apartment using a so-called “no-knock warrant.” None of the officers involved have been charged, and until this past weekend, her name was largely excluded from the media narrative. From The New York Times, “The exclusion of Breonna Taylor’s name is the latest iteration of a longstanding issue: Black women’s experiences of police brutality and their tireless contributions to mass social justice movements have almost always been left out of the picture, receiving far less media or political attention.” On June 5, social media celebrated her birthday—she would have been 27—and over the weekend, support for bringing her justice swelled. This petition needs your signature. NY Times

Something to think over

5. ‘We need to rethink our ‘pics or it didn’t happen’ approach to activism’

When we talk about ways to support the Black community, whether as an ally or as a member of it yourself, that discourse is often centered on showing up and speaking up, both admirable and necessary. However, writer Yomi Adegoke argues we need to rethink whether performative allyship, wherein we post on social media to “prove” we’ve supported the cause, is reflective of the real, everyday work some people are doing to move the needle in diversity. “I am not interested in statements fuelled by fear of cancellation,” she writes. “I am interested in those who maintain this energy when nobody is around to applaud it.” Vogue

Plus: There’s a lot going on

2020 has been exhausting, but with it have come some wonderful nuggets of wisdom. Here are a few folks who've said things better than we could.

Rate this article

Share this article

By Beth Castle

Managing Editor, InHerSight

Beth Castle is on staff at InHerSight, where she writes about workplace rights, diversity and inclusion, allyship, and feminism. Her bylines include Fast Company, Charlotte magazine, The Charlotte Observer, SouthPark magazine, Southbound magazine, and Atlanta magazine. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Don't Miss Out

Create a free account to get unlimited access to our articles and to join millions of women growing with the InHerSight community

Continue with social media or...

If you already have an account, click here to log in. By signing up, you agree to InHerSight's Terms and Privacy Policy

Poll the Community

Hundreds of thousands of women use InHerSight to navigate their careers. Anonymously ask for their insight on your most pressing work questions.

About InHerSight

InHerSight is the career navigator for working women. Founded on the belief that data measurement leads to advancement, we manage the largest database of women-rated companies, and we use those insights to match our users to jobs and companies where they can achieve their goals. Anonymously rate your current or former employer now to unlock our one-of-a-kind resources.