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5 Great Reads: Are We Still Wearing Makeup on Zoom Calls?

May 25: Good and insightful things we’ve read online in the past week

Image courtesy of Heizel

Workflow

1. ‘F*** the bread. The bread is over.’

Before the pandemic, writer and poet Sabrina Orah Mark interviewed for a university job that she didn’t get. From that experience, she artfully crafts this column about self-worth and work. For jaded job seekers and high-achievers, her words are cathartic: “Over the years I have applied for hundreds of professorships, and even received some interviews. I’ve wanted a job like this for so long, I barely even know why I want it anymore.” Ain’t that the truth. The Paris Review

2. ‘Dear graduates, I failed and failed until something worked’

As millions of new graduates enter, or attempt to enter, an uncertain workforce, Seattle writer Katie Herzog offers a word of advice: Fail. We’ve heard that advice before, but as Herzog recaps her career full of layoffs, her pragmatic, even sardonic, take on reinvention translates to the most realistic form of optimism we’ve seen in a while. The Atlantic

Read more: 12 Inspiring Commencement Speech Quotes for Soon-to-Be Graduates

3. ‘The inescapable pressure of being a woman on Zoom’

Women are doing the majority of the unpaid labor at home, yet for many, their appearance on work video calls is still a concern—and understandably so given how society nitpicks women’s appearance. As Leslie Goldman so poetically puts it, “a few things, including the sun rising and setting, the turning of the seasons, and women loathing their looks, remain unchanged.” Goody. Vox

Women we love

4. ‘The art collections are real; the owners are not’

Fanny Pereire has one of the coolest jobs you’ve never thought about. She creates art collections for film and television productions. So if you’ve binge watched Hulu’s Mrs. America, which dramatizes the Equal Rights Movement, you’ve seen Pereire’s faux exhibitions. What are we even doing with our lives? NY Times

Read more: Women-spiration: 7 Empowering New Shows to Stream (Spring 2020)

Total distractions

5. ‘The dishes will never be done’

Where, oh where, did all of these bowls come from? With her in-depth coverage of the country’s out-of-control dishware, Ellen McCarthy of The Washington Post wins the award for Most Relatable Story this week. If during quarantine, you’ve thought to yourself, “Why is that plate always in the sink and never in the empty dishwasher??” then take comfort in knowing that David Robertson of Canada is wondering that, too. The Washington Post 

Plus: Is this the most amazing thread on the internet?

Everyone is worried about being productive while isolating, but Justin McElroy has already done something remarkable: In an epic thread posted last week, he categorized every Disney song ever (with video clips), then created this Disney Songbook Table of Elements. Why? No idea. 

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By Beth Castle

Managing Editor, InHerSight

Beth Castle is on staff at InHerSight, where she writes about workplace rights, diversity and inclusion, allyship, and feminism. Her bylines include Fast Company, Charlotte magazine, The Charlotte Observer, SouthPark magazine, Southbound magazine, and Atlanta magazine. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

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