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Women in the News + Lizzo Forever

September 9: Badass women and the news that affects them

Mitra Norowzi
Contributor

Company Culture

  • Google (3.8 stars) will pay a record $170 million fine as part of a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission and the New York Attorney General, which found that Google-owned YouTube (3.1 stars) violated the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) by illegally collecting personal information from children without parents' consent. Google profited off the collection of this information by using it to create targeted ads. Because YouTube has such a large number of children-focused channels, the streaming site will now consider anyone watching creator-identified children's content as a child and limit data collection from those users. Personalized ads, commenting, and notifications will also be removed from creator-identified children’s content. Fortune

  • Ginny Fahs, a technology policy fellow at the Aspen Institute, makes the case for states to adopt legislation to protect against harassment in third-party business relationships, like those between entrepreneurs and investors. Along with three other tech veterans, Fahs co-founded #MovingForward, an organization dedicated to changing the culture of the venture capital industry and lessening the power imbalances it creates. The Atlantic

  • Under the leadership of Tom Ford, the Council of Fashion Designers of America has made a significant stride toward achieving the diversity that is so often lacking in the fashion industry by appointing four new board members: Haitian-American designer Kerby Jean-Raymond, Chilean-American designer Maria Cornejo, British-Jamaican designer Carly Cushnie, and African-American designer Virgil Abloh. Women’s Wear Daily

Quick Hits

  • In a post-#MeToo study, 19 percent of men said they were reluctant to hire attractive women, 21 percent said they were reluctant to hire women for jobs involving close interactions with men, and 27 percent said they avoid one-on-one meetings with female colleagues. Is it just us, or do 100 percent of men who are afraid of their female colleagues seem overwhelmingly sexist? Harvard Business Review

  • Fewer people are getting married these days. A study by the Journal of Marriage and Family claims it’s because there are fewer “economically attractive” men (guys with a good income and a steady job) for single women to marry. We...are going to leave that one alone for now. Yahoo! Lifestyle

  • Veterinarians are dying by suicide at alarming rates, according to the CDC. Male vets are 2.1 times more likely and women vets are 3.5 times more likely to die by suicide than the general population. Sixty percent of veterinarians are women. This piece by NPR lays out the multitude of factors that put vets at risk for suicide, including student debt, long hours, emotional distress, and access to lethal drugs. NPR

  • For the first time, the NHL selected four female officials to work during a pre-training camp. The league and Commissioner Gary Bettman say they aim to have women officiate at the NHL level. The Washington Post

Pop Culture

  • Crazy Rich Asians co-writer Adele Lim has departed from the film’s sequel project after learning that her salary was only one-eighth of what was offered to her co-writer Peter Chiarelli. From the two planned sequels, Chiarelli stood to make $800,000 to $1,000,000, while Lim stood to make “$110,000-plus.” The Guardian 

  • Lizzo just took a DNA test, turns out she’s 100 percent—the first black woman solo artist to top the Billboard Hot 100 chart this year after her hit song “Truth Hurts” ascended to the No. 1 spot. Two years after its initial release. She joins the small handful of black women who’ve topped the chart in the past, including Beyonce, Rihanna, Janelle Monae, and Cardi B. Looks like Lizzo’s radical self-love is here to stay—a truth that doesn’t hurt one bit. Slate

Around the World

  • Thailand: New additions to the Child Protection Act of 2003 will prohibit Thai students from wearing clothing deemed too revealing by the country’ Education Minister, such as short skirts and tight shirts. Parents of children who break the dress code could face fines of up to 30,000 Baht ($979 US). The new regulations have supposedly been put into place to curb sexual harassment of school age students, but the Thai government has been criticized in the past for this type of victim-blaming approach, notably warning women to avoid wearing anything considered “sexy” in the lead up to the Thai new year in 2018. VICE

  • United Kingdom: Out of 3,585 sex-discrimination suits in the U.K. in the past two and a half years, 2,195 were dropped before court rulings. This Bloomberg piece analyzes some of the reasons why—from repeat bad actors to Britain’s strict libel and privacy laws. Bloomberg

  • India: India might not have made it to the moon on Saturday, but their mission was a milestone nonetheless. The Indian Space Research Organisation mission was the first one to be led by two female scientists. PRI

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