US Navy

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InHerSight Score

Score based on 2,171 ratings from 141 participants

2.8

 
Personal Development

Personal Development

2.9
Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

3.0
Family Support

Family Support

2.6
Paid Time Off
3.7
Wellness Initiatives
3.6
Maternity and Adoptive Leave
3.5
Equal Opportunities for Women and Men
3.4
Learning Opportunities
3.2
Management Opportunities for Women
3.1
Salary Satisfaction
3.1
Family Growth Support
2.8
Overall Satisfaction
2.7
Employer Responsiveness
2.6
Sponsorship or Mentorship Program
2.5
The People You Work With
2.5
Female Representation in Top Leadership
2.4
Social Activities and Environment
2.4
Flexible Work Hours
1.8
Ability to Telecommute
1.4

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Comments


 

Hard to be a female sailor and push past the stereotypes of using our bodies to get ahead. Opportunities to advance are few and far between, leadership does not care about us, and if you are a female considering starting a family-DON’T. They are not as a family friendly as they try to say they are. The salary is no good. I barely bring in 24K a year. The only things worth it even a little bit is the health care (which is mostly sub par but free) and the life insurance (which is pretty good). Overall, not a place for a woman who wants to feel valued.

Indifferent Rater

I wouldn't want any of my female relatives to join the US Navy, you can work as hard as you can and still be harassed, and demeaned every day. Your concerns over your safety will be ignored.

Very Unsatisfied Rater

For the military being all about EO, the navy you'd think would be better. However, it is not. I was discriminated and provided much lesser opportunity for education and growth than my male counterparts, and all because my leadership looked at me as "just another female". Males in my line of work have gone to 3 to 6 schools, I was never provided further education. Same goes for the other females in my line of work. Very few get 1 and maybe 2 schools if they're lucky. Also, there is 0 leniency given to pregnant women during the most difficult months in the first trimester. It took until week 9 for someone to recognize how sick I was and tell me to take care of myself instead of continue to go in and be sick and a potential hazard because of the circumstances. Leadership seldom recognizes the women that are running operations, and applauds men instead, across departments.

Very Unsatisfied Rater

I work with men, mainly. My current LPO, has it out for me. He treats me worse than everyone else and gives me the most work to do. He has no compassion for sick days, leave days, or medical appointments. Everything is an issue between me and him and any time I try to seek leadership around EM1 Somera, I am reprehended for my actions. It’s the classic case of reprisal. I do everything I’m asked to do, my work always gets done on time if not early. Yet, he still finds issues with my work. I can’t do anything right. People like him need to be demoted. His comments in the work place to other men are LUDE AND UNPROFESSIONAL. he has talked about getting a blow job from one of the other sailors for an EP evaluation. When questioned about his joke, we got yelled at and dismissed from the room.

Very Unsatisfied Rater

I love the responsibility of leadership; however, it's tricky to be viewed as an equal working I. A male dominant environment. I feel strongly that females must act "meaner" or more aggressively than males do to be taken seriously. It's how I've "proven" myself to be an equal.

Indifferent Rater

 

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