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AT&T

InHerSight Score

Score based on 4,996 ratings from 334 participants

2.8

 
Personal Development

Personal Development

2.7
Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

3.2
Family Support

Family Support

2.6
Equal Opportunities for Women and Men
3.4
Management Opportunities for Women
3.3
Learning Opportunities
3.2
Paid Time Off
3.2
Female Representation in Leadership
3.2
The People You Work With
3.1
Salary Satisfaction
3.0
Maternity and Adoptive Leave
3.0
Overall Satisfaction
2.9
Sponsorship or Mentorship Program
2.8
Employer Responsiveness
2.6
Family Growth Support
2.4
Flexible Work Hours
2.3
Ability to Telecommute
2.3
Social Activities and Environment
2.3
Wellness Initiatives
2.2

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Comments


 

Upper management sweeps sexism, bigotry, and bullying from store management under the rug. HR does nothing when you contact them. They ignore your calls and never respond to emails.

Very Unsatisfied Rater
Early Career

AT&T has a lot of female leadership, but you'll never work your way up to those roles through the retail sales channel (although they'll insist it's possible). In the retail channel, you can kiss your personal and social life goodbye. Women are overlooked for management promotions by the male-dominated middle management teams - very good ol' boys club mentality. If you're a male who is super aggressive/high performing with sales (read: willing to lie to customers to close a deal, preferably without getting caught), you'll be promoted over anyone else, even if you've got the intellectual capacity of a marshmallow. Having integrity, doing what is right/best for your customer, and a willingness to sacrifice your personal time to go above and beyond your duties (coming in early, staying late, handling escalations) for the company mean little to nothing. If you are lucky enough to get promoted to management, your counterparts will insist that you got there by *ahem* unsavory means or by being a cold, callous robot who would murder her own parents for a promotion. Also, watch out for "surpluses" - if you have a male counterpart, he will keep his job, while you'll be laid off or demoted despite you having more education, experience, and tenure than said male counterpart. If you have the audacity to have a child while working in the retail setting, be warned that managers will require you to have a doctor's note saying that you must have time and space available for lactation (they tried to discipline my coworker, with the intention of firing her for "repeated offenses" when she would excuse herself from the sales floor), despite any state laws that would prohibit such practices. My advice? If you want a leadership role as a female in this company: skip entry-level and don't apply until you have an MBA (they offer tuition reimbursement, but you'll never have time to complete a Master's program while working retail hours). Being white, blonde, and upper-middleclass (you know, the people with rich parents who pay for their schooling so they can focus on that degree and emerge debt-free) will dramatically increase your odds. Good luck, ladies!

Unsatisfied Rater
Early Career

AT&T is one of those companies that embodies “Do as I say, not as I do.” They have great programs like Women of AT&T and AT&T University but don’t actually allow employees to have the time to utilize those programs. The only thing I have seen women of AT&T do in 5 years is an online silent auction to raise money for themselves. The top item was a one hour mentoring session with one of the executives for $200+! The program is supposed to mentor female employees, not make them pay for mentoring!

My biggest problem with AT&T is the way I have been treated when trying to advance my career. I have been routinely talked down to, passed over for promotion in favor of lower-performing shorter-tenure male employees. There is a very strong “boys club” culture that dominates the work environment. At one point I was even told because I had filed a harassment complaint I was no longer eligible for a management position I had applied for even though I would not be working with that employee. The reality is AT&T doesn’t care about workplace professionalism or treating its female employees equally.

Very Unsatisfied Rater
Mid-Level

Most horrendous place to work for. Turn over is high and company doesnt care about you

Very Unsatisfied Rater
Mid-Level

Worst company ever. Avoid.

Very Unsatisfied Rater
 

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AT&T women are making amazing things happen. And from employee networks to women in STEM programs, the tools to do it are right at their fingertips. Plus, we consistently rank among the best companies for diversity and inclusion. So the real question is, want to join us?

Our Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) are a great way for our employees to connect and share their goals for the future. In fact, our Women of AT&T ERG was founded in 1972 as one of the first employee groups of its kind. So, it’s no surprise that talented women have been making their mark all over our company for decades – creating a positive, empowering environment at AT&T and beyond.

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